Compare 07/11/2016

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History is a vast early warning system.
  --Norman Cousins, editor and author (1915-1990)

(19:1.10-11)The study of causation is the perusal of history. But the knowledge of how a being becomes does not necessarily provide an intelligent understanding of the present status and true character of such a being.
    History alone fails adequately to reveal future development—destiny. Finite origins are helpful, but only divine causes reveal final effects. Eternal ends are not shown in time beginnings. The present can be truly interpreted only in the light of the correlated past and future.

(81:6.15) Might does not make right, but might does make what is and what has been in history. Only recently has Urantia reached that point where society is willing to debate the ethics of might and right.

(90:2.9) Many true teachers have appeared among the various tribes and races all through the long ages of evolutionary history. And they will ever continue to appear to challenge the shamans or priests of any age who oppose general education and attempt to thwart scientific progress.

    Norman Cousins was an American political journalist, author, professor, and world peace advocate.
    Cousins attended Teachers College, Columbia University, and began his editorial career in 1934. From 1942 to 1972 he was editor of the Saturday Review. Following his appointment as executive editor in 1940, he introduced essays that drew a connection between literature and current events, whereupon circulation of the magazine increased 50 percent. Unafraid to criticize, Cousins was outspoken and his articles sometimes bitter. At times he criticized the U.S. government, but he felt strongly that a unique potential for greatness existed in America; he wrote The Good Inheritance: The Democratic Chance (1942) to explore this idea. Cousins felt modern problems stemmed from the absence of a collective voice and from Americans’ inability to see their social and political dilemmas clearly. In 1972 Cousins left the Saturday Review but returned the following year. In 1980 he was named “editor emeritus.” In his final years he was adjunct professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral science at the University of California at Los Angeles.
    Cousins wrote on a variety of subjects, including a biography of Albert Schweitzer and a book of reflections on mankind in the atomic age, Modern Man Is Obsolete (1945). In 1979 Anatomy of an Illness appeared, a book based on Cousins’ own experience with a life-threatening illness and exploring the healing ability of the human mind. Later works include Human Options (1981), The Physician in Literature (1982), and The Pathology of Power (1987).