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It's impossible to be loyal to your family, your friends, your country, and your principles, all at the same time.
   --Mignon McLaughlin, author (1913-1983)

P.1397 - §5 (127:2.7)  Jesus' position was made more difficult because his mother and uncle, and even his younger brother James, all urged him to join the nationalist cause. All the better Jews of Nazareth had enlisted, and those young men who had not joined the movement would all enlist the moment Jesus changed his mind. He had but one wise counselor in all Nazareth, his old teacher, the chazan, who counseled him about his reply to the citizens' committee of Nazareth when they came to ask for his answer to the public appeal which had been made. In all Jesus' young life this was the very first time he had consciously resorted to public strategy. Theretofore, always had he depended upon a frank statement of truth to clarify the situation, but now he could not declare the full truth. He could not intimate that he was more than a man; he could not disclose his idea of the mission which awaited his attainment of a riper manhood. Despite these limitations his religious fealty and national loyalty were directly challenged. His family was in a turmoil, his youthful friends in division, and the entire Jewish contingent of the town in a hubbub. And to think that he was to blame for it all! And how innocent he had been of all intention to make trouble of any kind, much less a disturbance of this sort.

    Mignon McLaughlin (June 6, 1913 - December 20, 1983) was an American journalist and author. She wrote two volumes entitled Neurotic's Notebook. She is known for a number of quotes, among them:
"A successful marriage requires falling in love many times, always with the same person."
"Anything you lose automatically doubles in value."
"Every society honors its live conformists and its dead troublemakers."
    Mignon McLaughlin was born in Baltimore, Maryland, and grew up in New York City, where her mother, Joyce Neuhaus, was a prominent lawyer. She graduated from Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts, in 1933 and returned to New York, where she embarked on a career as a journalist and a writer of short stories for Redbook, Cosmopolitan, and other women's magazines.
She worked for Vogue magazine in the 1940s, and was Copy Editor and Managing Editor of Glamour magazine in the 1960s and early 1970s. She retired to Florida in 1973. She died in Coral Gables, Florida on December 20, 1983.
    With her husband Robert McLaughlin—an editor at TIME Magazine—she wrote the play Gayden, which had a limited run on Broadway during the 1949 season.