Compare 10/08/2013

Tom's picture

In some circumstances, the refusal to be defeated is a refusal to be educated.
  --Margaret Halsey, novelist (1910-1997)

(34:7.8) Having started out on the way of life everlasting, having accepted the assignment and received your orders to advance, do not fear the dangers of human forgetfulness and mortal inconstancy, do not be troubled with doubts of failure or by perplexing confusion, do not falter and question your status and standing, for in every dark hour, at every crossroad in the forward struggle, the Spirit of Truth will always speak, saying, "This is the way."

(48:6.35) From them [Seraphim] you will learn to let pressure develop stability and certainty; to be faithful and earnest and, withal, cheerful; to accept challenges without complaint and to face difficulties and uncertainties without fear. They will ask: If you fail, will you rise indomitably to try anew? If you succeed, will you maintain a well-balanced poise—a stabilized and spiritualized attitude—throughout every effort in the long struggle to break the fetters of material inertia, to attain the freedom of spirit existence?

    Margaret Halsey (1910-February 4, 1997) was an American writer who lived in the United Kingdom for a short time. Her first book With Malice Towards Some (1938) grew out of her experiences there. It was a witty and humorous bestseller, selling 600,000 copies. It won one of the early National Book Awards: the Most Original Book of 1938, voted by members of the American Booksellers Association.
    According to her obituary in The New York Times, she was "a witty writer with an acute social concern, [and] was compared to Dorothy Parker and H. L. Mencken".
    Several of her books were controversial or took on controversial subjects. Color Blind: A White Woman Looks at the Negro was banned in Georgia and favorably reviewed by Margaret Mead. It attacked racism by identifying at its core the fear of the sexuality of black people and the need for a cheap labor supply. The Pseudo-Ethic: A Speculation on American Politics and Morals was a defense of Alger Hiss.