Compare 10/24/2013

Tom's picture

Before the next 25 years are out, we will most likely find that our solar system contains a bevy of large worlds—frozen planets as big as Mars and Earth and perhaps even rivaling Uranus—ejected eons ago into cold storage in the Oort cloud. Yes, I predict that school children of 2030 will be taught that our quaint view of a nine-planet home system was myopic, for technology will ultimately reveal that our system has many more planets than we could ever have dreamed of.
  --Alan Stern (b. 1957)  planetary scientist and Executive Director, Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute.

P.656 - §2 (57:5.6)  As the Angona system drew nearer, the solar extrusions grew larger and larger; more and more matter was drawn from the sun to become independent circulating bodies in surrounding space. This situation developed for about five hundred thousand years until Angona made its closest approach to the sun; whereupon the sun, in conjunction with one of its periodic internal convulsions, experienced a partial disruption; from opposite sides and simultaneously, enormous volumes of matter were disgorged. From the Angona side there was drawn out a vast column of solar gases, rather pointed at both ends and markedly bulging at the center, which became permanently detached from the immediate gravity control of the sun.
    This great column of solar gases which was thus separated from the sun subsequently evolved into the twelve planets of the solar system.

P.656 - §5  (57:5.9)  The five inner and five outer planets soon formed in miniature from the cooling and condensing nucleuses in the less massive and tapering ends of the gigantic gravity bulge which Angona had succeeded in detaching from the sun, while Saturn and Jupiter were formed from the more massive and bulging central portions.

P.658 - §4 (57:6.7)  3,500,000,000 years ago the condensation nucleuses of the other ten planets were well formed, and the cores of most of the moons were intact, though some of the smaller satellites later united to make the present-day larger moons. This age may be regarded as the era of planetary assembly.
    3,000,000,000 years ago the solar system was functioning much as it does today. Its members continued to grow in size as space meteors continued to pour in upon the planets and their satellites at a prodigious rate.
    About this time your solar system was placed on the physical registry of Nebadon and given its name, Monmatia.

    S. Alan Stern (born 22 November 1957, New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American planetary scientist. He is the principal investigator of the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Chief Scientist at Moon Express.
Stern has been involved in 24 suborbital, orbital, and planetary space missions, including eight for which he was the mission principal investigator. One of his projects was the Southwest Ultraviolet Imaging System, an instrument which flew on two space shuttle missions, STS-85 in 1997 and STS-93 in 1999.
    Stern has also developed eight scientific instruments for planetary and near-space research missions and has been a guest observer on numerous NASA satellite observatories, including the International Ultraviolet Explorer, the Hubble Space Telescope, the International Infrared Observer and the Extreme Ultraviolet Observer. Stern was Executive Director of the Southwest Research Institute's Space Science and Engineering Division until becoming Associate Administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate in 2007. He resigned from that position after nearly a year. In early 2009 Dr. Stern's name has been mentioned as a potential contender for the position of NASA administrator under President Obama's Administration. Stern has stated however that he is not interested in the position at this time given his desire to spend time with his family.