Compare 12/19/2016

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The characteristic of a well-bred man is, to converse with his inferiors without insolence, and with his superiors with respect and with ease.
  --Lord Chesterfield, statesman and writer (1694-1773)

107:3.3-6 Although we know something of all the seven secret spheres of Paradise, we know less of Divinington than of the others. Beings of high spiritual orders receive only three divine injunctions, and they are:
    1. Always to show adequate respect for the experience and endowments of their seniors and superiors.
    2. Always to be considerate of the limitations and inexperience of their juniors and subordinates.
    3. Never to attempt a landing on the shores of Divinington.

    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield was a British statesman, man of letters, and wit. He was born in London to Philip Stanhope, 3rd Earl of Chesterfield, and Lady Elizabeth Savile, and known as Lord Stanhope until the death of his father, in 1726. Educated at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, he subsequently embarked on the Grand Tour of the Continent, to complete his education as a nobleman, by exposure to the cultural legacies of Classical antiquity and the Renaissance, and to become acquainted with his aristocratic counterparts and the polite society of Continental Europe.
    In the course of his post-graduate tour of Europe, the death of Queen Anne (r. 1702–14) and the accession of King George I (r. 1714–27) opened a political career for Stanhope, and he returned to England. In the British political spectrum he was a Whig and entered government service, as a courtier to the King, through the mentorship of his relative, James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope, the King's favourite minister, who procured his appointment as Lord of the Bedchamber to the Prince of Wales.